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TEETH SENSITIVITY: CAUSES AND TREATMENTS

TEETH SENSITIVITY: CAUSES AND TREATMENTS

It is a feeling of sensitivity inside the tooth surface when it is exposed to thermal (heat or cold), chemical and tactile (pressure or movement) stimuli.

After any dental treatment, teeth may become sensitive. This is their way of letting you know that they've been injured. Any injury (cavity, tooth clenching/grinding, gum infection) can injure the nerves in a tooth. This should not last long if the teeth are kept clean. If the teeth are not kept clean, the sensitivity will remain or get worse.

How is it like?


It is marked by sharp pain that lasts for a few seconds. The pain is usually felt when drinking cold water or consuming candy or sweet/Sour foods and exposure of the tooth to air.

Is teeth sensitivity pain like tooth decay pain?


Yes, in early stages when the infected pulp is still capable of returning to a healthy, non-inflamed state. it is better to see a dentist to know exact problem.

Why are my teeth too sensitive?


The condition is very common and is caused by exposure of tiny canals that are in the tooth thereby exposing inner tissue to the mouth environment.

Why do I feel the pain:

The crown, is composed of three layers – enamel, dentin and pulp. Enamel does not have a nerve supply. The nerve supply of the tooth lies inside the pulp but some nerve fibers are located in dentin. The nerve fibers present inside dentin, when stimulated or irritated, are responsible for teeth sensitivity.

What are the causes of teeth sensitivity?

● Grinding of teeth
● Vigorous tooth brushing
● Using a toothbrush with very hard bristles
● Excessive consumption of acidic foods
● Receding gums
● Ongoing periodontal treatment
● Faulty dental restorations
● Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD)
● Pregnancy
● Fracture

Are your teeth hypersensitive?

If your teeth are especially sensitive consult with your dentist. This could be a sign of the need for root canal treatment or a gum tissue graft. Or a desensitizing toothpaste (with potassium nitrate) or concentrated fluoride gel (0.4% stannous- or 1.1% sodium-fluoride) may do the trick.

Talk to your dentist ,if you don’t need restoration of the tooth with dental Cement, He/she will recommend:

● Minimizing the consumption of acidic beverages/foods
● The toothpaste you can use and
● How you can brush your teeth
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