BRUISE


BRUISE

A bruise forms when a blow breaks blood vessels near your skin's surface, allowing a small amount of blood to leak into the tissues under your skin. The trapped blood may cause a bruise that at first looks like a black-and-blue mark and then changes color as it heals.

If your skin isn't broken, you don't need a bandage. But you can enhance bruise healing with these simple techniques:
• Elevate the injured area.
• Apply an ice pack wrapped in a towel or a cloth dampened with cold water. Do this for about 10 minutes. Repeat several times a day for a day or two after the injury as needed.
• Rest the bruised area, if possible.
• Consider acetaminophen (Tylenol) for pain relief, or ibuprofen for pain relief and to reduce swelling.

CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR IF YOU:
• Notice very painful swelling in the bruised area
• Are still experiencing pain three days after a seemingly minor injury
• Have frequent, large or painful bruises, particularly if your bruises appear on your trunk, back or face, or seem to develop for no known reasons
• Have easy bruising and a history of significant bleeding, such as during a surgical procedure
• Notice a lump (hematoma) form over the bruise
• Are experiencing abnormal bleeding elsewhere, such as from your nose or gums or in urine or stool
• Suddenly begin bruising, but have no history of bruising
• Have a family history of easy bruising or bleeding
These signs and symptoms may indicate a more serious problem, such as a blood-clotting problem or blood-related disease.
Powered by Blogger.