Preventive Health Care

Health Clinic


What are preventive care services?


It’s important to visit your doctor regularly to get preventive care. Preventive care lets your doctor find potential health problems before you feel sick. By finding medical problems early, your doctor can help you get the care you need to stay healthy.

Preventive care includes:
  • Immunizations
  • Physical exams
  • Lab tests
  • Prescriptions

Children immunizations

VACCINERECOMMENDATION
Chickenpox (varicella)1 dose between 12 – 15 months old. Second dose between 4 – 6 years old. For kids 14 and older with no history of the vaccination or disease, 2 doses 4 – 8 weeks apart.
Diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis)1 dose of DTaP at 2, 4, 6 and 18 months old. 1 dose of Tdap between 11 and 12 years with a Td booster every 10 years after. Those older than 7 years and not previously immunized can get a single dose of Tdap.
Flu (influenza)2 doses 4 weeks apart for healthy children between 6 months and 8 years the first time they get the vaccine. Children who’ve previously had the flu shot can receive 1 dose annually.
Haemophilus influenza type b1 dose at 2, 4 and 6 months and once between 12 – 18 months old
Hepatitis A2 doses at least 6 months apart between 12 – 23 months old. For children not previously immunized, 2 doses can be given at least 6 months apart at your doctor’s discretion.
Hepatitis B1 dose to all newborns before leaving the hospital, a second dose between 1 – 2 months and a third dose between 6 – 18 months. May begin between 2 – 18 years old if not immunized as a baby.
HPV (human papillomavirus)3 doses over a 24–week period starting at age 11 for boys and girls. Your doctor may give the vaccine as early as age 9 if your child is at high risk.
Polio 1 dose at 2 and 4 months and between 16 – 18 months (3 doses total). Then, 1 dose between 4 – 6 years old.
Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR)1 dose between 12 –15 months and a second between 4 – 6 years. Can be given to older children if no history of vaccination or the disease.
Meningitis (meningococcal)1 dose between 11 – 12 years, with another dose at 16 years. If the first dose is done between 13 – 15 years, then give the second dose between 16 – 18 years. Doctors may give vaccine as early as age 2 if your child is at high risk.
Pneumonia (Pneumococcal)1 dose at 2, 4 and 6 months and again at 12 to 15 months. Children over age 2 can get a single dose if not previously immunized. Children with an underlying medical condition can receive an additional dose. Children at high risk can be vaccinated after age 7.
Rotavirus1 dose at 2, 4 and 6 months old

Adult immunizations


VACCINERECOMMENDATION
Chickenpox (varicella)2 doses 4 weeks apart for those with no history of the vaccination or disease
Flu (influenza)1 dose every year
Hepatitis A2 doses for those at high risk
Hepatitis B3 doses for those at high risk
HPV (human papillomavirus)3 doses over a 24–week period up to age 26
Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR)1 – 2 doses if no history of the vaccination or disease. Can be given after age 40 if at high risk.
Meningitis (meningococcal)1 dose for ages 19 – 24 if no history of vaccination. Can be given after age 40 if at high risk.
Pneumonia (Pneumococcal)1 dose for those 65 and older. Those at high risk or with a history of asthma or smoking should have 1 dose between ages 19 and 64 with a booster 5 years later.
Shingles (herpes zoster)1 dose for those 60 and older
Tetanus, diphtheria and whooping cough (pertussis) 1 dose if no history of pertussis vaccine regardless of interval since last tetanus vaccine, followed by tetanus every 10 years. This vaccine is recommended especially if you have contact with children under age 1.
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