Asthma and its natural treatments

Asthmatic woman

Asthma is a specific type of allergic reaction and is common symptoms are coughing; wheezing; shortness of breath; and tightness in the chest. It is triggered by anything that irritates the airways and causes the symptoms of asthma. Everyone’s asthma is different and you may have several triggers. An important aspect of controlling your asthma is avoiding your triggers. It may be impossible to avoid all of your triggers, but once you’ve identified them, there are things you can do to help reduce unnecessary symptoms and better control your asthma.

It can be difficult to identify exactly what triggers your asthma. Sometimes the link is obvious – for example when your symptoms start within minutes of coming into contact with a cat or dog. But some people can have a delayed reaction to an asthma trigger so some extra detective work may be needed.

If you think you may have asthma, discuss it with your doctor or clinic staff, and try to obtain an asthma pump to carry with you in case an attack becomes particularly severe. It could save your life!

Natural treatments for Asthma


Onion (Allium cepa)

Eat the onion raw as a treatment for allergies. See more health benefits of onions

Celery (Apium graveolens)

Take the extraction juice of the celery plant.
Dose: 1 tablespoon, 3 times a day.

Pawpaw or papaya (Carica papaya)

Eat the ripe fruit. Here are more medical uses of papaya or pawpaw

Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus)

Make an infusion of the leaves. Dose: 30 grams to 1 liter of water, 4-5 cups a day.

Banana (Musa paradisiaca)

Uproot a whole banana plant when it is about 1 meter high, and bake it in the oven. Press out the juice and mix it with honey. Use 1 cupful a day.

Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata)

Make purple cabbage juice into a syrup.

Artichoke (Cynara scolymus)

Mix a decoction of the artichoke with lemon juice.

Ginger (Zingiber officinale)

Make an infusion of the rhizome.
⚠Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.
Powered by Blogger.