Pregnancy and Motherhood: Taking Care of Your Health

pregnancy and motherhood

There's a lot to remember when you're pregnant or a new mom — not just doctor appointments (though there are LOTS of them), but things like which medications to avoid during pregnancy or breastfeeding, how and when to introduce solid food to the baby, and when you and baby need tests and vaccinations.

But sometimes it can be a challenge to take the steps we need every day to stay healthy. Somewhere between the morning rush, a packed day at work, and all of the practices and homework — we need to remember to eat well, stay active, and help our families stay healthy, too.

So I know how vital it is to have a little help in staying healthy. Today, we're highlighting some of the tools that help women to take care of their children and, just as importantly, themselves.

That means you should without fail visit, prenatal care, breastfeeding counseling, and screening for gestational diabetes or depression. There may also be preventive services available at no out-of-pocket cost for babies, such as screenings for developmental health, behavioral health, and conditions like sickle cell anemia.

When you are pregnant, do not hesitate to call your doctor or midwife if something is bothering or worrying you. Sometimes physical changes can be signs of a problem.

Call your doctor or midwife as soon as you can if you:
  • Are bleeding or leaking fluid from the vagina
  • Have sudden or severe swelling in the face, hands, or fingers
  • Get severe or long-lasting headaches
  • Have discomfort, pain, or cramping in the lower abdomen
  • Have a fever or chills
  • Are vomiting or have persistent nausea
  • Feel discomfort, pain, or burning with urination
  • Have problems seeing or blurred vision
  • Feel dizzy
  • Suspect your baby is moving less than normal after 28 weeks of pregnancy (if you count less than 10 movements within 2 hours.
  • Have thoughts of harming yourself or your baby
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