What happens when a girl gets wet? Find out!

What happens when a girl gets wet? Find out!

Getting wet is the way a woman’s body responds to sexual excitement and desire. When a woman is sexually excited, blood flow increases to the genitals so that the vulva and clitoris swell and the vagina lubricate itself, which is called “getting wet.” Being “wet” reduces friction and makes penetration more comfortable. There’s also another kind of “wetness” that girls and women experience — vaginal discharge, which is also called leukorrhea. Normal discharges are either thick and whitish or slippery and clear, depending on where a woman is in her menstrual cycle. Vaginal discharge is perfectly normal and healthy — it’s the vagina’s way of naturally cleaning itself.

READ ALSO, Vaginal discharge: What’s abnormal and what's not? Find out!

Here’s what else you need to know:


What is vaginal wetness?


Most vaginal fluid is made primarily of water, along with some salts like phosphate and sodium chloride, organic compounds such as lipids and amino acids, antibodies that help the body reduce the risk of infections, and old cells from the lining of the vagina, uterus, and cervix.

A thin layer of vaginal fluid typically lines the walls of your vagina and is important for a number of reasons—it provides lubrication that makes sex more comfortable, can minimize or prevent vaginal pain, and even supports fertility. Many different factors can contribute to vaginal wetness, including your age, hormone levels, medications, stress, level of arousal, infections, and perspiration. Here’s more information on how some of these factors contribute to vaginal wetness:

Arousal


As you become aroused, blood flow to your genitals increases, which triggers the release of fluid from the cervix and the Bartholin’s glands, which provides lubrication during sexual activity. Often, the more aroused you’re feeling, the more vaginal lubrication your body will produce.

Hormones and age


Hormones play a big role in vaginal wetness. Higher estrogen levels lead to increased vaginal wetness, but as your body starts to produce less estrogen during menopause and afterward, your body may not produce as much vaginal fluid, making your vagina drier.

Meanwhile, as you move through your menstrual cycle and ovulation approaches, your cervix produces more vaginal fluid, which plays an important role in helping sperm travel to an egg during the process of fertilization.

Infection


Sometimes you will feel more wet than usual if you have an infection such as bacterial vaginosis. The vaginal fluid helps to remove bacteria from the vaginal canal. Infections may also lead you to produce other types of vaginal discharge, which will vary in appearance depending on the type of infection. But if you notice any discharge that’s an abnormal color or smell, you’ll want to get in touch with your physician.

Medication


Hormonal birth control can alter your vaginal fluid production, leaving you more wet or dry than you’re used to when not taking the medication.

How do I know if I need to see a doctor?


Vaginal wetness is perfectly normal. In fact, in many cases, it’s a sign that your vagina is healthy. But there are a few signs and symptoms that let you know a trip to the doctor may be in order. Here are a few:
  • You have vaginal discharge that smells bad or appears different than what you’re used to.
  • You’re experiencing burning, itching, sensitivity, and/or pain in the vaginal area.
  • Your vaginal area is swollen.
  • You’ve been experiencing vaginal dryness.
  • You’ve started taking a new medication and have noticed that you’re more or less wet than usual.
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